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Full text of "Alexander von Humboldt"

324                           LIFE' OF
which was publislied with Ms name in 1806, in Ber-
lin. It is the largest poem he has written, and may
be considered one of the most remarkable poetical
productions, both for its sentiments and the highly-
poetical form.
This poem is written with great ease and clearness ;
and only where the poet soars into entirely ideal
regions, as towards the conclusion, his thoughts refuse
to take a very comprehensible form. The poem was
originally dedicated to Humboldt's friend, Frau von
"Wolzogexi, whom he addresses in the last verses.
The Humbolclts left the Villa cli Malta in March of
the following- year, as it was too small for them, and
removed to a more roomy residence in the Strada Gre-
goriana, on the Trinita del Monte, qizite near the Span-
ish Place, which was the central point for strangers; and
here only was Humbolclt able to make his house a
temple of hospitality, open to every worthy comer.
From his large, lofty rooms, high windows afforded
the most beautiful view, and his hoiise was truly
Italian in its architecture, while German sociality
reigned within. Every evening1 the most mixed so-
ciety was gathered together at tea, and reminded
tliose present of Berlin or London companies. The
theatre only disturbed this arrangement sometimes,
and then Huniboldt did not fail to take as many
friends as possible with nim. Select friends were
invited to dinner, and ^after dinner they frequently
drove friends or strangers in their carriage through
the town and its environs. Report says that a cen-
tral reunion, like the one offered in Humboldtjs.
nouse, has not since that time existed in Home.
High and low met here ; the stream of strangers
which constantly flows through Home visited these
halls; all intellectual and artistic celebrities were
united in it, before all the German artists resident in
Home. For a quiet mind, the crowd which met here
every evening was almost too much. Here a cardinal
conversed with a German professor; there a painter
was obliged to converse for hours with a duchess in